© 2019 LANDED Peer Education Service

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Company House: SC346133

Scottish Charity Number: SC036012

Coming Up

A come up is when the effects of the drug you have taken begin to take place in the body. If you have never taken a drug before, it is important for you to research its effects so you know what to expect. Taking drugs can be unpredictable and you might not have the same experience every time.

LANDED does not condemn or condone drug use. However, we recognise that people might use drugs and it's important to know the facts in an effort to keep yourself safer.

Coming Up Safely

We have put together some information to inform you about coming up:

  • Some drugs might take longer than others before you feel an effect - so be prepared for a bit of a delay

  • Tell your pals what you have taken and how much you are taking.

  • Don't wander off by yourself, stay with people you know.

  • Have a bottle of water to hand to avoid dehydration.

  • Make sure your phone is charged and has credit before going out.

  • Never leave a mate alone.

  • Try to have a sober sitter, especially when using hallucinogenic drugs.

  • You might experience nausea and or sickness

  • It's difficult to dose drugs. The amount your friend takes might not be the right amount for you. Age, weight, gender, ethnic background and even how tired you are all play a part in how drugs affect you specifically.  

  • Start low and go slow. Take small amounts of the drug, let it get into your system and see how you feel. Allow time before you re-dose.

  • Know the layout of where you are, for example, in a club, make sure you know where the exit, toilets and staff are and arrange a meeting point with your group if you need help.

If you have just taken drugs and you feel unwell, do not be scared to get emergency medical help. 

Coming Down

What goes up - must come down! A comedown is the feeling you get when the drugs begin to wear off.

The best way to avoid a drug comedown is not to take any drugs in the first place. But if you are planning a big weekend which may involve drug use then make sure you’re armed with the facts – including the risks involved.

Comedown Essentials

There is no right or wrong way to experience a comedown. The best approach is to recognise that your body and mind are still feeling the effects of drugs and they need time to wear off - this could take days.

 

Here are some essential things you may need when coming down:

  • Time to recover

  • Support from friends

  • A safe, stress-free environment

  • Water

  • Orange juice (for vitamin C)

  • Sleep and rest

  • A good laugh

Remember a comedown doesn’t last forever, it’s just the drugs wearing off.

However, if your comedown has lasted longer than you expected and you don’t feel yourself returning to normal you should seek medical help.  It is important to explain what you have taken and the symptoms you are experiencing.

Physical symptoms could include:

  • being too warm or too cold 

  • having a racing pulse 

  • feeling dizzy

  • feeling sick 

 

You may also experience emotional or psychological symptoms such as:

  • low mood

  • anxiety

  • panic

  • distress

  • depression,

  • negative thoughts (especially if this involves hurting yourself or others)

If you are in a cycle of drug use (using drugs most weekends) the comedown may negatively impact your mental health. This is because your body and mind does not have time to fully recover in between sessions.

 

Mental Health Support

If you are feeling mentally unwell, you can contact the following organisations for advice and support. You are not alone.

Samaritans
Provide emotional support to anyone in emotional distress, struggling to cope, or at risk of suicide

116 123
https://www.samaritans.org/?nation=scotland

Breathing Space
Help address serious concerns about mental health wellbeing of people in Scotland

0800 83 85 87 ​

https://breathingspace.scot/

 

Childline

Get help and advice about a wide range of issues.

0800 11 11

https://www.childline.org.uk


Chris’s House
Suicide intervention and advice.

01236 766755

http://www.chrisshouse.org/
 

YAMS – You Are My Sunshine
Mental Health Support, Advice and Therapy Hub based in Brannock High School, Newarthill

Pop in and see us at theYAMS Hub, every Monday 630pm-9pm, Brannock High School, Loanhead Road, ML1 5AU 
https://www.facebook.com/YouAreMySunshineYAMS/

Medical Help

If you need medical help, you can use the services below.

Ambulance

999

NHS 24

111

https://www.nhs24.scot/

Police

101 or 999 in an emergency